What is Sensory Design and what does it have to do with cosmetics? We asked young designer Nandi, who spent a few months with the MÁDARA team.

Meet Nandi Boudaud, a Sensory Design student from France, who spent a few months in Latvia working with the MÁDARA team. She shares her experience and observations from her Sensory Designer’s and also French point of view.

Nandi, how would you describe yourself in a few words?
I’m always enthusiastic, curious and happy!
And what is this Sensory Design thing all about?
Sensory Design takes all five senses of a human body into consideration. Sensory designers encourage the use and stimulation of them all. It means we’re interested in the human body, its feelings. All the things it can experience.

MÁDARA product textures. Photo by Nandi

MÁDARA products and textures. Photo by Nandi

How did you discover this discipline?
I remember myself as a child when my mum used to take me to the market every Saturday. I discovered all kinds of vegetables and fruits I could touch and smell. I had fun watching fish. I also had to overcome my timidity every time I needed to buy bread on my own, while my mum queued for other things.

Still today, I enjoy this noisy and excited crowd and love to meet people I buy my groceries from face-to-face. I discovered that a Sensory Design programme was being launched at the Institute of Colour Image and Design. I applied, because I felt an instant, strong interest and connection with this field.


At the very beginning, you confessed it was your dream to visit the Baltic states. What was it about this place that appealed to you?
I was intrigued by this little country, it seemed mysterious to me. Because in France we don’t know much about Latvia.
Cosmetics are multi-sensorial products. You enjoy them using almost every sense.

Cosmetics are multi-sensorial products. You enjoy them
using almost every sense.

«WE ARE INTERESTED IN THE HUMAN BODY. IN ALL THE THINGS
IT CAN EXPERIENCE.»

Work in the lab can get pretty artistic – the pigments for experimental soap

Work in the lab can get pretty artistic – the pigments for experimental soap

What did you find interesting about MÁDARA – from a sensory point of view?
Cosmetics are multi-sensorial products. Using cosmetics, you use almost every sense – well, maybe except for taste. During my internship, I collected flowers and plants to create my own Latvian herbal book or herbarium to remind me of the Latvian nature and landscapes. I also took a lot of pictures of them and MÁDARA textures and packaging, went to the lab to create new soaps together with the perfumer Lubova. And I finished with a product review from my designer’s and also French point of view.


Nandi’s top MÁDARA products?
Body Oil. ‘Cause I love oils. In terms of feelings, they are not as ‘cold’ as creams when applied to the skin. Cleansing Milk. It works so fast and well, even if you have very dark makeup on. Exfoliating Oil-to-Milk Scrub. I like how I can play with the texture!
On the other side of camera. Photoshoot for MÁDARA Skincare for Humanity campaign. Photo by Vika Anisko.

On the other side of camera. Photoshoot for MÁDARA Skincare for Humanity campaign. Photo by Vika Anisko.

What is the most special, exquisite, unusual sensory experience during your stay in Latvia?
The traditional Latvian ‘pirts’ (sauna). Being lightly whipped with a sauna whisk, birch leaves touching the body. For me, it was, of course, very unusual to be naked in a public space.

And what are your plans for the nearest future?
I’m going back to France before my next internship. This time in social design.

Sum up your stay in one sentence!
Coooool (with the ‘l’ pronounced so charmingly softly only a Frenchie could do)! And unexpected.

« I WAS INTRIGUED BY THIS LITTLE COUNTRY,
IT SEEMED MYSTERIOUS TO ME.»

Nandi’s collection of Northern plants

Nandi’s collection of Northern plants